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Richard M. Tinkoff, DDS

Robert S. Tinkoff, DDS

Stacey Tinkoff, DMD

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How to Care for Your Child's Teeth

Oral health care for baby teeth is just as important as it is for adult teeth. Children will typically have some of their baby teeth all the way until they are 12 years old. Decay in baby teeth can affect the development of the adult teeth beneath them. Children will also typically get their first adult teeth (first molars) around 6 years old. It is important that your child brushes his/her teeth 2X a day for 2 minutes and flosses once a day, just like you! It is also important that you supervise and assist his/her brushing until he/she can properly maneuver the brush and floss on his/her own.

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If a cavity is found at your child's dental visit, and we determine it can be filled at our office, there are multiple ways you can help prepare your child for his/her filling appointment. The most important thing you can do is remain calm, and talk about the visit positively. Talk openly with your child about what he/she may experience (i.e. sleepy/puffy feeling in some of their teeth and lip, weird sounds). Reassure him/her that after the appointment, his/her mouth may feel funny, but that it will go away. Watch your choice of words. You may hear us describe the anesthetic as "sleepy juice", our drill as a "tooth scrubber", or our suction as "Mr. Thirsty". If you would like examples of kid-friendly words to use, please ask!

 

For additional resources for kids, please visit MouthHealthyKids.org